160+ Need To Know Digital Marketing Tips From Brighton SEO

160+ Need To Know Digital Marketing Tips From Brighton SEO

What can White-hat link builders learn from churn and burn spammers?


by Stacey MacNaught, Search Director, Tecmark

1. Having links in quantity still matters

2. Supplement content marketing with other tactics

3. Obtain forward features calendars wherever you can

4. Local and regional newspaper links are quick wins

Navigating an ocean of link data, a former pirate’s story


by Paul Madden, Co-Founder, Kerboo

5. People disavow poorly

6. Don’t be too harsh when cleaning up your link profile as you could lose valuable link equity

7. Always review the disavow file of new clients

8. “Hi [first name]” works 15% better than any other salutation

9. Best performing outreach works for those who have long-term relationships

10. Spend time building your relationships in order to get the best results

11. Coverage in nationals is good for secondary link building

12. Link equity is still massively important

13. Link variations help you stay safe from a Google penalty

Art, virtual snowballs, and the feels (or why beer is rarely the answer)


by Hannah Smith, Content Strategist, Funemployed

14. People only share/link to your content only if it resonates with them

15. People do not share formats, they share ideas

16. Figure out what works for your competitors and why

17. The tools we use can tell us what was successful, but not why

18. Your audience can be a great source of inspiration

19. Think like an artist

20. Focus on making people feel something

How a data-driven approach to content can make your online-business internationally successful

Shyam Dattani

by Shyam Dattani, Digital Strategy Specialist, Searchmetrics

21. If traditional ranking factors disappear, then SEO is dead too

22. If SEO is dead you need to be creative

23. SEO isn’t dead, there are 3 billion searches a day

24. Once Google understands your page it can help you with your search

25. Successful content is answering your users’ questions

26. Content is thinking about users’ intentions

Does CTR Really Affect Website Performance?

Sam Thomas

by Sam Thomas, SEO and Social Consultant, Climb Online

27. Page titles and meta descriptions are everything

28. Where you rank is one thing, getting people to click through is another

How a Reviews Strategy helps your SEO

Chris Bullick

by Chris Bullick, Managing Director and Head of Marketing Services, Pull Digital

29. 90% of consumers read reviews before visiting a business

30. 88% of consumers trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations

31. 31% of customers are likely to spend 31% more on a business with excellent reviews

32. Reviews can boost your results by using fresh user-generated content

33. Google favours highly-rated sites

7 More Things You Didn’t Know About Links

Christoph Cemper

by Christoph Cemper, Founder and CEO of LinkResearchTools, Link Detox and Impactana

34. Not all redirects are equal

35. Only 302 passes are pretty consistent

36. Only the 302 is fast and helpful

37. 307 redirects are not a lie, it’s only a Chrome bug

38. The best links are the ones your competitors don’t get

5 ways to use PR, and fuel your digital strategy (beyond link building)

Aisha Kellaway

by Aisha Kellaway, Digital PR Specialist, White.net

39. PR is about reputation – it’s what others say about you when you’re not there

40. You need to understand your business and every one of your target segments

41. Ensure you are communicating the right messages

42. Many companies use social as a one-way platform and wonder why there’s no engagement

43. Focus on quality social media posts rather than quantity

44. Keep on top of what’s being said about you by signing up for Google Alerts about your brand

Getting your users to do your content marketing for you

Sophie Turton

by Sophie Turton, Digital content manager, Bozboz

45. Audiences are in control of their own digital story

46. Content isn’t king, the customer is king and we as marketers are court jesters

47. Get your audience to be your content creators

48. Listen to what your audience care about and respond with your content

49. Community is a huge part of your success

How to avoid a site migration disaster

Jon Earnshaw

by Jon Earnshaw, CTO and Co-Founder, Pi Datametrics

50. Involve SEO from the start of a migration

51. You must use redirects and mapping for the best outcome

52. Make sure there’s someone in charge of the migration project

53. Keep the staging from getting out

How to Drive Growth through your SEO Audits: Questions, Validations and Tools to Maximize your Results


by Aleyda Solis, International SEO Consultant, Orainti

54. Make sure your SEO audit for growth is: strategically, prioritised, and actionable

55. Which of your competitors are getting the best out of mobile and how are they doing it?

56. What other queries does your audience search for?

57. The goals of your audit should be expected growth

58. You need to first establish your audit’s context to make your audit strategic

59. Which are your overall best-ranked queries and their related metrics?

60. What are your site’s top content per device? Identify which queries are performing the best and worst

61. Identify the areas bringing more organic search visibility per device and country

62. What is your organic search visibility and traffic to our competitors vs. yours?

63. Which pages are driving organic search visibility and traffic to your competitors vs. your pages?

64. What type of results features are your competitors using to maximise their visibility?

SEO for news. We do WHAT?

Malcolm Coles

by Malcolm Coles, Director of Digital Media, The Telegraph

65. How Google news may work: relevant content, second search behaviour, publication date of a specific piece of content, CTR, return rate

66. What to do: content calender, understand user behaviour, minute-by-minute plan, a good headline, delivery of the promise

67. Think of the searcher’s intent

68. Expect AMP to be a ranking factor in the future

Why Local Search Is Essential for Brands And Agencies Who Serve Them

Christian Ward

by Christian Ward, EVP, Partnerships, Yext

69. 33% of all Google searches are for location

70. 76% of nearby mobile searches result in a transaction

71. 28% of these result in a purchase

72. Google local ranking factors: relevance, distance – and prominnce

73. Google is returning more local results than ever

74. A complete and accurate profile shows up in Google Maps as a page label

75. If you have multiple brick and mortar locations add embeddable maps and directions

76. Add local content to your website (business description, products and services)

77. How Google local works: consistency, authority and number

78. Google needs publisher suggestions to keep local business details up to date

79. Do your best to lock and protect listings

80. Make real time updates

81. Ask for reviews from your happy or loyal customers

Making Your Website Record-Breakingly Fast


by Fili Wiese SEO Consultant, SearchBrothers.com

82. When you give Google a choice it’s not very good at picking what it needs to choose

83. SEOs are challenged as the landscape is ever changing

84. Search relevance is as important as it ever was

85. Think about your audience and what they want from you

86. What are people trying to find on your site? If they’re using the search box then it’s because they can’t find it

87. Make sure the content on your site answers questions

88. If you aren’t providing useful content, there’s no reason for people to speak to you




by Will Quick SEO Director, Havas Ecselis

89. Using last click attribution is like Tesco counter staff being responsible for all of Tesco’s income

90. There is no one size fits all approach, it’s all done through trial and error


Why the ‘new keyword = new page approach to SEO’ is bonkers


by Meghan Burton Director of SEO, Epiphany

91. Users find speed very important

92. If Google can’t crawl it, you can’t rank for it

93. Rather than mobile first it should be content first: we could have moved onto other devices in five years’ time

94. Don’t link to redirects

95. People don’t invest enough time in the back end of their site


A Strategy for the New Wave of Video Platforms

Phil Nottingham

by Phil Nottingham Video Strategist, Wisita

96. All social networks now offer video platforms (Facebook, Snapchat, Daily Motion, Vimeo, Vine, Pinterest etc)

97. Just having a video is not a strategy

98. Work out who your target market are instead of creating your video and simply pushing it out there

99. The most important thing to ranking on YouTube are clicks, not keywords

100. Think of your thumbnails like film posters

101. Optimise before you build your content – test before you invest

102. Build some low effort versions of your ad to test

103. View-through conversions are the best metric to judge your video ads on

104. Use playlists to rank for terms you don’t have videos for on YouTube

105. Almost one third of Facebook users exclusively use it on mobile

106. Take a visual-first approach

107. Understand what worked for Charlie Chaplin and the silent movie era!

108. Close captioning allows users to watch without sound

109. Use text as a creative element to help give a flavour of what’s going on

110. YouTube has a 5-second skip button, Facebook gives you 3 seconds max to capture the user’s attention

111. On Instagram condense big videos into 15-30 second pieces

112. Tag all of the hashtags on Instagram – this really helps your video to be discovered

113. Periscope works when you can show the user something they otherwise couldn’t get hold of

114. Snapchat is mobile only: phones are useful tools for video creation

115. Snapchat’s USP is that it’s ephemeral – it only lasts for a certain length of time. This makes it exciting and interesting

116. You never know what you are going to get when you click through to Snapchat

117. You need to create a strategy, and idea, to get people talking about it in the pub

118. What you can do with a phone is just as exciting as what you can do with a giant camera

119. The world of social media is about doing more, smaller, lower quality videos


How To be a Facebook Advert Superhero


by Greg Gifford Director of Search and Social, DealerOn

120. Facebook ads used to be really annoying but now Facebook have got really good at targeting and got a great ad platform

121. Facebook offers amazing ad targeting capabilities

122. Facebook ads are very cost-effective

123. The key to successful Facebook ads is to be extremely picky with your targeting

124. Use awesome images

125. You have got to have a goal to start with to build your ads towards

126. Set a measurable number, a due date – and workable guidelines for your goal

127. Page post engagement = good for boosting content reach, works with published or unpublished posts

128. Page likes = good for growing post engagement

129. Page likes are a vanity measurement

130. Clicks to website = drive users to a landing page; ads don’t have to go to a Facebook page

131. Website conversions = great for lead generation and ecommerce, requires tracking pixel and ad must be tied to a Facebook page

132. App installs = sends users directly to app store

133. App engagement = drive usage metrics by re-engaging current app owners

134. Offer claims = direct users to offer on Facebook (must have at least 50 page likes)

135. Local awareness = best Facebook ad of all!

136. Facebook ad image sizes = 600×314 or 1200×628 pixels

137. Facebook image ads should be less than 20% text

138. Always track links with UTM parameters

139. Always track conversions with pixels

140. Always use ad scheduling – maybe you only need to schedule when your doors are open etc.

141. Never stop A/B testing ads, especially with images

145. Want to increase sales? Run three different ad types – Offer ad (shipping/% off etc.), Carousel ad (product images) and Website clicks ad (to increase traffic)

146. Use Power Editor when creating your ads – gives you a lot more target demographics, bulk uploads, bulk edits

147. Take advantage of the insane, in-depth demographic targeting

148. You can target Life events (new jobs, birthdays, newly weds etc.) and friends of people who are having a Life event (friends of friends who are getting married etc.)

149. You can target parents – based on the age of their children, or their children’s interests

150. You can target political beliefs


Overcoming Launch Fear

Lexi Mills

by Lexi Mills Managing Director, Manyminds Digital

151. Craft onsite content in the voice of a spokesperson

152. Sell an exclusive to one publication (if one doesn’t take it, it needs tweaking)

153. Publish onsite content once exclusive goes live

154. Wider media selling-in

155. Newsletter/social/email marketing can then promote it

156. Some journalists don’t even have to like what you’re promoting if it’s clickbait

157. Some journalists don’t have a choice about what to cover – over 50% have to cover Trending Topics

158. Search for keywords rather than exact phrases

159. Look to early adopter communities to find trends before they start trending

160. Work out what is working best for journalists and their competitors and repackage accordingly

161. Things that worked in the past often work again

162. Cut your stories up like a cake so you can give different angle of your exclusives – Images, Interviews, Data, Videos, Demos etc.

163. Video helps with the selling-in process

These tips were collated live at the event, so please forgive any misspellling. Thanks, Lisa. lbollins@receptional.com  


Lisa Bollins

Lisa joined the link building team in October 2014, bringing skills in content writing and blogger outreach. When she’s not at work she can be found writing away on her beauty blog, drinking tea, on Twitter, or with deaf Jeff the cat. Lisa is Google Analytics Qualified.

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